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  • in reply to: Mast Track Repairs #12575
    Paul White
    Paul White
    Keymaster

      There is another stronger track used by 29er, 49er and other skiffs which may be a good solution if you are having problems with the sail pulling out of the track – especially the SQ 9.3 sail which has more luff curve and therefore puts more strain on the top and bottom of the track.

      It’s available by the metre from 29er dealers (such as NB Sailsports) and from some riggers (e.g. Sheerline Yacht Masts) and lines up well with the white track if you don’t want to replace the entire track.

    • in reply to: Foam Floor Tiles for Tramp Frame Padding #11169
      Paul White
      Paul White
      Keymaster

        I omitted one vital instruction- put the padding in place under the tramps!

        Remove the trumps from the ama edge by untying the lashing underneath, then use the cable ties to apply the padding, then replace the tramps and retie underneath.

      • in reply to: Weta Boat Covers #11166
        Paul White
        Paul White
        Keymaster

          My only caveat about the Rain & Sun covers is that they don’t fully cover the bottom of the amas or the main hull. If you have a colour that fades in UV (e.g. Yellow) then you can end up with a “tide mark” halfway down the hull. The other thing is that the cover has loads of straps which clip together to secure it which is robust but time consuming – a drawstring or shockcord around the edge of the “skirt” would make it much easier to secure.

        • in reply to: AMA arms end fittings #11158
          Paul White
          Paul White
          Keymaster

            Hi Pascal

            All the ones I’ve seen have been cut off vertically. I wonder if a previous owner has cut them like that to make it easier to insert them.

            The only issue is that you can’t support the ends with an internal  ring (as Weta used originally) or the new fibreglass insert which is less prone to falling out since it has a larger surface area for glue.

             

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          • in reply to: Replacing jib cleats with Spinlock Cam Cleats #10303
            Paul White
            Paul White
            Keymaster

              After a while you may find your Spinlocks fail to grip the rope. It’s most likely to be the cleat mechanism sticking so soak them in warm water to remove the salt and when dry, spray with silicone spray.

            • in reply to: Outboard motors and brackets #10297
              Paul White
              Paul White
              Keymaster

                Comparison of output and specifications of Electric Outboard motors here

              • in reply to: How to speed up rigging your Weta #10268
                Paul White
                Paul White
                Keymaster

                  Another modification to the list instead of 6.

                  Thread a double length of rope for the ama ties through the tramp edge (butt the two ends together and put some tape to hold them in place temporarily). Now you don’t have to re-tie the front at all – just leave it in place and loosed the back  – then pull through some slack at the front to allow the ama arms to go over the boat with the tramps still attached. When rigging, all you have to do is pull the tramp line from stern and roll up the slack the same way you do for the halyards which creates a nice handhold for pulling the tramps taught.

                • in reply to: Trouble Lifting Mast #10262
                  Paul White
                  Paul White
                  Keymaster

                    Some more tips for mast raising:

                    1. Raise the mast on the trolley, not the trailer. It reduces the height you have to lift the mast.

                    2. Turn the boat stern-to-wind.   This keeps you from fighting the wind when lifting the mast on deck (the shrouds keeping the mast from blowing forward).

                    3. Use the two-step approach, resting the mast vertically on the moose head before raising it onto the deck (or climbing on deck) this greatly shortens the final lift.

                    4. Tie an extension to the screecher halyard and run it through the bow ring and back through one of the jibsheet cam cleats.   Put the bitter end, with plenty of slack, into a pocket before climbing on deck.   When the mast is in its step, take out the slack and cleat it. Remove the halyard extension once the forestay is in secured.

                    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Paul White Paul White.
                  • in reply to: Trouble Lifting Mast #10261
                    Paul White
                    Paul White
                    Keymaster

                      The hinged mast step is now available from Weta dealers.

                    • in reply to: Action Camera for a Weta #10240
                      Paul White
                      Paul White
                      Keymaster

                        The Drift Stealth 2 has finally been replaced by the Drift Ghost X which keeps the same small, lightweight format but the standard battery life has been extended to an excellent 5 hrs which can be upgraded to 8 hrs with an external battery pack (not compatible with the optional waterproof case – required on a Weta).

                        Also available is the Drift Ghost 4K which give a much higher resolution output but at the cost of battery life.

                        Available from Amazon UK for £129 , Amazon USA for US$129 and from Camzilla in Australia for AU$179.00

                        Specifications

                        Camera Dimensions: 43 x 82.2 x 32.4MM

                        Camera Weight: 120g

                        Water Resistance: IPX4

                        Processor: Ambarella A12

                        Sensor: OV4689 4MP

                        Battery Life: 1080P30: 5 Hours, 1080P30(w/ LL battery): 8 hours

                        Screen: Dot-matrix backlit rear LCD

                        FOV: 140 degree

                        Rotating Lens: Yes – 330 degree

                        Wi-Fi: 2.4G only

                        Remote Control: Not compatible

                        Microphone: Mono Microphone

                        Video Resolutions: 1080P (1920*1980): 25/30 FPS, 960P (1280*960), 720P (1280*720), WVGA (896*480)

                        File Format: H.264 MP4

                        Zoom: 10X (Through App)

                        Photo Mode: 4/8/12 MP

                        Video Tagging: YES

                        Car DVR: YES

                        Instant On: YES

                        Anti-Vibration: N/A

                        Memory Capacity: Micro SD, SDHC, SDXC Memory Cards up to 128GB

                        Live Streaming: Yes – up to 1080P

                        Cloud Services: Auto Video Editing, Live Stream too Youtube, Facebook, 10GB Free Cloud Storage

                      • in reply to: Action Camera for a Weta #10234
                        Paul White
                        Paul White
                        Keymaster

                          The excellent budget option, the TCL SVC200 has been discontinued. However, after OEMing the SVC200 as the XTC300, Midland in the USA seem to have continued with a similar camera with an upgraded spec and battery life (4 hours) as well as adding other features with the XTC400VP.

                          The 140º lens is better than the 127º of the TCL they have added WiFi ability (and a rather flakey phone App) but dispensed with the side LCD display which the SVC had. It now has a rotating lens which means you can mount it at any angle. It still has the simple magnetic on-off switch of the the TCL but requires a rather heavy waterproof case to be fully waterproof. The camera and case together weigh over 240g which may be a bit much on the end of a pole but will be fine mounted on the bowsprit.

                          Price US$95 on Amazon USA

                          Review here  – Video Review here

                          Technical Specs
                          RESOLUTION Record Time: Viewing Angle:
                          1080p: 1920x1080p video at 30/25 fps (NTSC/PAL) at 105° field of view (FOV).
                          720p: 1280x720p at 60/50 fps with 142° FOV.
                          WVGA: 848×480 at 120/100 fps with 142° FOV
                          STILL IMAGES 12MP
                          LENS 7 elements (6 tempered glass, 1 IRF)
                          LENS ROTATION 270° variable (90˚ counter clockwise, 180˚ clockwise)
                          FOCUS 5 inches to infinity
                          ASPECT RATIO 16:9
                          FORMAT MPEG-4 (mp4) Compression: H.264*
                          LIGHT SENSITIVITY 1.5 V / Lux. second
                          STORAGE Micro SD card up to 32GB (class 6 or higher, not included)
                          TRANSFER USB 2.0
                          POWER Li-Ion 1700mAh rechargeable battery
                          AUDIO AAC
                          OPERATING SYSTEM Win XP SP2+, Vista, 7 and 8. Mac OS X 10.4+
                          WEIGHT: Camera 140 grams (5 oz.) with waterproof housing 242 grams (8.5 oz) .

                          • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Paul White Paul White.
                          • This reply was modified 1 year, 1 month ago by Paul White Paul White.
                        • in reply to: Mast Track Repairs #10213
                          Paul White
                          Paul White
                          Keymaster

                            Hi Martin

                            I missed your question.

                            Yes, the UV will have an impact especially if the boat has been left with the mast up or without a cover with the mast exposed. It tends to make the plastic brittle and therefore easier to crack when raising or lowering the mast.

                            The problem is that once the bolt rope has jumped out of the track it’s very difficult to stop it happening again without replacing as the track gets forced apart.

                            Paul

                          • in reply to: Trouble Lifting Mast #10209
                            Paul White
                            Paul White
                            Keymaster

                              Hi Susie

                              I’ve passed on your request to Roger.  In the meantime, you may be interested in the method developed by Linda Wright who shares your physique.

                              ”I have posted some photos to help illustrate how I (being challenged in height and upper body strength) step the mast by myself.  The mast is very light, but I still find it to be a shaky affair and prefer a more secure means of stepping and unstepping the mast, even though it takes a little longer to set up.

                              First, install a small pad eye at the base of the mast on the forward side.

                              The following steps are for taking the mast down.  Putting the mast up is the reverse of it, but harder to describe going in that direction.

                              Step 1.  Run a single, continuous line from pad eye at base of mast, through a downhaul block on the bar immediately behind the mast (starboard side), through a cleat (starboard side), through a cleat (port side), through a downhaul block on the bar (port side) and tie to pad eye again.

                              Cleat in such a way that there is enough room to move the mast forward by one diameter of the base.

                              Step 2.  Tie on a second, much longer lashing line to the forestay, lead back to one of the jib sheet cleats and hang it on the horn cleat on the mast so you can reach it later.  Now, you can unlash the primary lashing line completely.   Then un-cleat the long line to let the mast rock back a little bit on the bar …enough so that you can just see part of it showing at the groove and re-cleat it.

                              Step 3.  Get into the boat and lift the mast straight up off the bar and set on deck just forward of the mast base (base tether line should no longer be slack.  At this point, mast is still secure, even if you let go of it.

                              Step 4.  Now take long line off of horn cleat, but do NOT un-cleat from jib sheet cleat until you are standing  sideways as far back in the boat as you can without tipping backwards (my back foot is just forward of the tether pad eye in the bottom of the boat).

                              Step 5.  Put one hand on the mast approximately shoulder level and un-cleat the long line with the other hand.  Now you can ease the mast back slowly, grab with both hands and ease it down until it is resting on the aft beam where it meets the socket (somewhat of a diagonal angle from mast base).

                              The ability to lay the mast a bit away from the centerline of the boat is one advantage of this system over a fixed, stainless hinge that forces the mast to lay straight down the middle.  It gives you room to get into the center of the boat when lifting and lowering the mast.  The lines at the base, if adjusted correctly, limit the amount the base can kick up to almost nothing.  When initially raising the mast, you will have the mast base just forward of the step and can lean into the tether line for leverage as you are lifting it up off the aft beam.”

                              Note that the photos are from her boat which had been modified to take part in the Everglades Challenge with a self-tacking jib and bow steering system for use when paddling while sitting on the bow.

                               

                               

                               

                              • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Paul White Paul White.
                              • This reply was modified 1 year, 5 months ago by Paul White Paul White.
                              • in reply to: Trouble Lifting Mast #10264
                                Paul White
                                Paul White
                                Keymaster

                                  Susie asked :

                                  How to slot the amas by yourself. 

                                  Put the boat on some grass or sand.

                                  Lift the Ama from the trolley and lay it on the grass/sand so that the ama arms line up with the hole in the main hull (you may need to do this by moving the end of the arm so it lines up). Now lift the ama so it remains horizontal (lift just aft of the forward arm) and push the ama arms into the holes. Tighten the tramp ties to make sure they are fully inserted.

                                  How to raise the main sail by yourself, especially when it comes out of the track.

                                  If the mainsail is coming out of the track, then you need to replace the section of track!

                                  Also use silicon spray to lubricate the track.

                                  • This reply was modified 1 year ago by Paul White Paul White.
                              • in reply to: This is an amazing boat! #10202
                                Paul White
                                Paul White
                                Keymaster

                                  What a great endorsement and I think all of the other Weta sailors would agree with you!

                                  Can I have your permission to send this to Weta Marine for the website/Facebook Page – and if you have a photo with the boat even better.

                                  Paul

                                  My eMail is ausweta@gmail.com

                                   

                                Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 103 total)