Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 60 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • in reply to: 2016 Jervis Bay Regatta 1-2 Oct 16 #1460
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    There are some suggestions on the bottom of the newsletter:

    Accommodation
    Stayz have apartments and houses from $200/night, AirBNB from $148/night, Camping or Cabins at Jervis Bay Cabins & Caravan Park from $140/night.

    in reply to: Weta performance in light wind (less than 10 knots) #1406
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    The Weta struggles to overcome the drag from 3 hulls in less than 5 knots but between 5-8 knots it’s OK and it will plane upwind above 8 knots in flat water. It gets fun above 10 knots and really fun up to about 30. More than that is ok and depends on the sea state – but it will be very wet and fast but easier than survival sailing especially without the jib.

    The main advantages of the Weta over the Wave are:

    1. Sail area

    The Weta has 123 ft² of sail for main and jib but then there’s also the Genneker which adds another 26 ft². Up to about 5 knots it can pay to use the Genneker as a “code zero” by sheeting it in hard,  which doesn’t allow you to point much but is better than not moving at all. The combination of main and jib is more efficient than main alone because of the effect of the airflow over the main from the jib.

    The Wave only has 95 ft² of mainsail in total.

    2. Weight

    The Wetas carbon and fibreglass construction means it only weighs 265lbs fully rigged for a boat which is 18.10′ x 11.6′ when rigged (but only 14.5’x5.7′ on the trolley) with a 21.6′ mast.

    Wheres the Wave is 245 lbs of Rotomolded Polyethylene and is 13′ x 7′ with a 20′ aluminium mast.

    3. Daggerboard and tacking

    The Weta daggerboard and jib means it tacks like a monohull even in light winds whereas the mainsail only of the Wave and twin hulls means it’s quite hard to tack in light winds.

    4. Optional sails

    There is a larger 42ft² Genneker available and also a number of 3rd party “fat-head” mainsails available which increase the size by about 10%.

    Weta are testing a new lightweight hull and larger mainsail combination for use in areas with light winds.

    Hope this helps

    Paul

    #325, Sydney

     

    in reply to: Roller Furler upgrade to continuous furler #1402
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    1
    Down

    If you don’t sail in over 20 knots of breeze you could get away with using a 2:1 ratio system for the Harken furler as it gives you a double the number of furling turns for half the effort (as described in this forum post).

    However, if you do decide to upgrade, I also upgraded my boat from the Harken furler to the KZ Furler and removed the fairlead.

    Like all the cleats on the Weta, it’s held in place with self-tapping screws rather than bolts, so it’s very easy to remove – I’d advise cleaning the old sealant off the screws and adding a dab of new silicon sealant before doing them up again.

    Hope this helps

    Paul

    #325, Sydney

    in reply to: Anyone have their Grey Weta stolen in Southern CA? #1306
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    I think I found a copy of the Ad here (although it has now been removed from Craiglist).

    It does strike me as suspicious too – why would someone steal all the parts of a Weta which an owner would typically take away with them to prevent it from being stolen?

    There is a second serial number stamped on a metal tag underneath the transom bar.

    Paul

    in reply to: World Masters Championships Auckland 2017 #1294
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    The NOR is now available here.

    There are only 30 charter boats available at a cost of NZD$ 1,500 plus a refundable NZD$500  damage deposit for the week of the event.

    Boats will be allocated on a first come first served basis with the newer boats allocated first.

    We are investigating shipping over a container of boats from Australia which will increase the number of charters available for other overseas visitors.

    We’re also investigating the option to buy a new Weta for delivery in Auckland and have it shipped home after the regatta.

    in reply to: Weta Wanted #1293
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    I believe that Glenn Marney knows of a few owners who may be interested in selling.

    Regards

     

    Paul

    in reply to: Weta T-Shirts #1271
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    There is a range of customisable Weta designs which can be applied to a wide range of shirts and other merchandise in your size and colour at Zazzle.

    australian_weta_class_tshirt-r1b9a22c326cd4d2aada06529896216f6_vj78g_324 buy_happiness_with_a_weta_tshirt-re3519b247f87487e91ecaaef637e6e7b_va6lr_324 weta_trimaran_design_on_long_sleeve_t_shirt_tshirt-r05045b6da87c47c3ab7f153eae6fb7cf_8nhdf_324 weta_trimaran_design_on_long_sleeve_t_shirt_tshirt-r46074f40eef74eab9c7138b9b847b463_8nhdf_324 weta_trimaran_design_on_long_sleeve_t_shirt_tshirt-r065507004e1d491b8ceffe4d98ff7a91_8nhdf_324 weta_trimaran_design_on_long_sleeve_t_shirt_tshirt-rbf9db893bf894e4da7deb56ee7039608_8nhdf_324

    in reply to: Outboard motors and brackets #1247
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    Hi Glenn

    I’m not sure since that was a photo from the Yahoo Weta Forums – but I suspect it would be stainless steel as aluminium would need to be pretty thick to be able to take the weight of an engine and probably would have to be welded to accept the bends in the plate shown in the photo.

    You might be interested in this universal bracket solution http://www.v-lock.com which looks as if it doesn’t require a backing plate as the load is spread over the surface it’s attached to.

    You’d then be able to mount an angled motor bracket to it or a lifting version here.

    You could also use stainless toggle bolts to anchor you fitting to the stern without having make a hole in the cockpit to add a backing plate.

    The mounting boards tend to be either hardwood or polyurethane.

    This bracket on eBay may be a good cheap alternative.

    Hope this helps

    Paul

     

     

    • This reply was modified 6 years ago by Paul White.
    in reply to: Spray Guards #1227
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    FAQ for Spray Guards (from Steve McLelland)

    – Why?
    They keep the wife happy (and dry)!  They keep the salt water out of your eyes!

    – How well do they work?
    Extremely well!  The ones pictured are the 3rd version and have been well tested in just about all conditions.
    – How much spray do they really cut down?
    They cut down nearly 100% of the firehose spray (esp for your crew).  It really dries the boat out.  The only remaining spray comes off the of the bow of the ama itself or the small amount that escapes from the edges if you really slam into a wave.

    – Do they change the boat performance?
    Someone would argue “yes”, but it’s minor if anything; especially on days when you need them ;).  In light air, roll them up and use velcro straps to hold them under the lip.  If it heats up, it’s quick to unroll them and open them on the water.

    – What conditions have you tested them in and have you had problems where it causes the boat to do something unexpected (pitch)
    I’ve tested them in a wide range of conditions from ~25 knots in seas, down to using them as a place to store gear on Texas-zero-wind-days.  I push the boat as hard as I can and usually use 12.9 kite well outside of it’s operating range and have had zero issues.  If anything it actually might help keep the bow from going under since the spray hits so hard when you’re overpowered.

    – What about when you burry the ama, doesn’t the fabric catch and drag you down?
    Actually if you look at the height of the corner of the carbon tube relative to the bow height, you’ll see that there is a good amount difference.  That gives plenty of room to the allow the water to flow under it.  Even burying it completely, the spray guard is still above the water.

    – Do they make noise or flap around?
    No, they are just like the tramps.

    – How are the attached?
    I tried a bunch of different attachments and simple has been the best!  On the bow, I just put a small piece of spectra through the same holes as the forestay.  Then tied a figure-eight on the top and tied it tight underneath.   On the stern-side, I ended up drilling through the lip of the boat and installing the two Ronstan eyelets under the lip (see photos).  I tried a bunch of non-drilling solutions (to the stern, to the poles, even had d-rings sewn into the main traps).  The simple mechanical connection is the way to go!  Two holes and you’re done.   The outside of the triangle, where it attaches to the ama; same thing, I tried a bunch of options and simple was best.  The webbing just loops once around the carbon tube, and then through the clasp along the edge and it’s done.

    – Are they easy to put on and take off?
    We ended up using a bimini top clasp that allows for super easy adjustment and tensioning.  Just pull it through and yank it and it’s tight.  This is also so that when you come into the shore, you can loosen it with one hand and jump off the front to catch the boat.  I was planning on taking them on and off, but I don’t.  I just leave them on all the time, even when trailering and so on.  I just roll them up and put a velcro tab on and call it a day.  Go sailing = unroll, loop webbing around carbon tube and pull tight.  If you did want to remove them, then just unloop the webbing on the back, and untie in the front and you’re done.

    – What fabric did you use?
    I tried a few types and settled on basically the same fabric that the tramps are made of, with a polyester 1″ webbing that runs around the edge.   Also the fabric is on the bias (45 degree angle) so that the weave is parallel to the boat.  This allows more tension in the fabric along the hull.
    http://www.sailrite.com/Trampoline-Mesh-Black-74

    – Can you stand/sit on them?
    Surprisingly yes.  I’ve stood on them.  They sag to the water level but, they’ll hold you.

    – If I made another set, would I change anything?
    Yes, I’d add an additional layer of fabric along the inside edge to stiffen them and prevent the super hard spray from misting through the fabric.

    – Who did the sewing and what did it cost?
    A local sailmaker whipped them up from my home-sewn prototype.  Around $50 of labor.

    • This reply was modified 6 years ago by Paul White.
    • This reply was modified 6 years ago by Paul White.
    in reply to: Outboard motors and brackets #1145
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    There are some French outboard solutions using Electric and Petrol motors on the French Weta forums  here

    in reply to: Outboard motors and brackets #1132
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    Hi Laurent

    I don’t know which harbour you use, but according to this research data, the current at Zebrugge is around 4 Knots.

    20 Kmh is equivalent to 10.7 knots but there are so many variables you can’t say exactly what speed you’d get. Not forgetting that you can use the sails to supplement the output of the outboard. If there is more than (say) 8 knots of breeze you’d probably go as fast with the sails and no outboard and of course a small boat like the Weta can hug the shore to get out of the current.

    According to this test, the Torqueedo would give you a speed of around 6 knots as shown here.

    A 2.5hp petrol engine would be faster and could allow the boat to plane – the little Super Chibe 1HP motor would give you around 3-4 knots – depending on wind/waves. A 2.5 engine should be good for about 5-6 knots. There’s a test on a small boat here which gives speeds for different outboards.

    Use a GPS or a GPS App on a smartphone like iRegatta to check your speed.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Paul White.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Paul White.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Paul White.
    in reply to: Jervis Bay Oct 3-4, 2015 #1129
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    Is anyone else interested in sharing a house for the weekend?

    Stayz has a number of properties nearby http://www.stayz.com.au/accommodation/nsw/south-coast/jervis-bay

    Last time we stayed at this one which is asking for $155/night for three nights

    It’s a bit basic but has a barbecue and a hose and drying area at the back.

    Paul

     

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Paul White.
    in reply to: Outboard Bracket for Weta #771
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    This is a theoretical solution but I don’t think it would work as described because the transom is too small for the off-the-shelf glass suction handle.

    However, Seasucker makes marine suction cups which have stronger suction and are designed for marine use as well as being available in individual units. They have been used for an outboard mount on a Sup as you can see in the video below.

    There’s also a Weta owner who has modified one of these canoe outboard mounts to clamp across the cockpit side at the stern so that the outboard is mounted at the side.

    in reply to: WETA Wanted in the UK #743
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    It’s probably also worthwhile contacting George Morris at the UK Weta Class Association http://www.weta.org.uk

    georgewhitleymorris@gmail.com

    The other suggestion is to consider importing one from France as over 100 have been sold there and they’ve just received a shipment of 2015 Wetas –  so some of the existing owners may be looking to upgrade.

    They have a Forum here http://forum.weta.fr/

    And a Facebook Page which has a boat listed which would seem to fit your budget.

    GREY WETA #457 still available for 6500€ excl. 20% VAT!

    Although I think that boat is kept outside the EU – hence VAT has not been paid and you would have to pay VAT in order to bring it into the EU.

    Hope this helps

    Paul #325 Sydney (but originally from the UK)

    in reply to: Screacher Unwraps in Strong Winds #739
    Paul White
    Keymaster
    Up
    0
    Down

    The reason it unwraps is usually because the top of the screecher hasn’t furled tightly – the way to make sure its wrapped tight is to :

    a) Furl it facing directly downwind as this allows you to keep the top of the sail taught when furling.

    b) Keep some tension on the screecher sheet as you furl it so that it’s pulled down toward the bottom of the furler as this prevents slack sail being wound on at the top of the furl.

    You can do this by

    –  Cleating the sheet on the trolley cleats at the stern (it helps if you turn them round so they are easier to use for this purpose),

    – Putting your foot on the sheet while you furl

    – Use one hand to keep holding the sheet down while you furl with the other (easier if you have spare crew!).

    Hope this helps.

    Paul #325, Sydney

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 60 total)